Demonstrations:
Inattentional Blindness + Change Blindness
 
 
This page contains links to stimuli and movies relating to our recent experiments on the nature of visual awareness, as studied with the phenomena of inattentional blindness and change blindness.


Incidental change blindness in an extremely simple event (Coming soon)
 
Choi, H., & Scholl, B. J. (under review). Incidental change blindness in an extremely simple event.


Perceiving ensembles without perceiving individuals?
 
Ward, E. J., Bear, A., & Scholl, B. J. (2016). Can you perceive ensembles without perceiving individuals?: The role of statistical perception in determining whether awareness overflows access. Cognition, 152, 78-86.


'Event type' representations in visual perception: Containment vs. occlusion
 
Strickland, B., & Scholl, B. J. (2015). Visual perception involves 'event type' representations: The case of containment vs. occlusion. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144(3), 570-580.


Sustained inattentional blindness and the capture of awareness
 
Most, S. B., Scholl, B. J., Clifford, E., & Simons, D. J. (2005). What you see is what you set: Sustained inattentional blindness and the capture of awareness. Psychological Review, 112(1), 217-242.


An implicit measure of 'change blindness blindness'
 
Scholl, B. J., Simons, D. J., & Levin, D. T. (2004). 'Change blindness' blindness: An implicit measure of a metacognitive error. In D. T. Levin (Ed.), Thinking and seeing: Visual metacognition in adults and children (pp. 145-164). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.


Featural similarity in sustained inattentional blindness
 
Most, S. B., Simons, D. J., Scholl, B. J., Jiminez, R., Clifford, E., & Chabris, C. F. (2001). How not to be seen: The contribution of similarity and selective ignoring to sustained inattentional blindness. Psychological Science, 12(1), 9-17.


Spatial proximity in sustained inattentional blindness
 
Most, S. B., Simons, D. J., Scholl, B. J., & Chabris, C. F. (2000). Sustained inattentional blindness: The role of location in the detection of unexpected dynamic events. Psyche, 6(14).